Category Archives: Democratic Republic of the Congo

Finding My Way Around the Corruption System with a Map: Mapping the Effects of an Intervention and Extending Systems Mapping to New Areas

Peter Woodrow is the Executive Director of CDA Collaborative Learning Projects. For nearly a year, Peter has accompanied the Kuleta Haki project providing support to our local partners (RCN J&D) on using systems maps as an analytical tool for better understanding corruption dynamics in the criminal justice sector. In April, Peter shed some light on this process, and updates us now on how both the tool, and techniques for facilitating these types of workshops, have developed since his initial engagement.

For the past year and a half, we at CDA have been working with local stakeholders and partners to develop a strategy for combating corruption in the criminal justice system in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). After completing a broad national level analysis of corruption dynamics, the project focused on Katanga Province in southeastern DRC. As discussed in other blog posts, the main approach has been to establish a local network of people, including judges/magistrates, lawyers and others dedicated to promoting change in the system of corruption in the local criminal justice sector. Click here to see the theory of change for the project. Continue reading

La Corruption et le Genre à Lubumbashi : quelques points de vue

Cette semaine, RCN J&D – exécutants du programme de CAASDI – a parlé avec moi en ce qui concerne les éléments du blog « les femmes sont-elles moins corrompues ? ».  Ces deux praticiens, Longin (Chef d’Antenne) et Patricia (Chargée du Projet), possèdent une connaissance énorme du secteur de justice criminelle, en tant qu’un ex-juge burundais, et une avocate pratiquante de RDC. Ils travaillent en ce moment avec un réseau anti-corruption d’acteurs judicaires à Lubumbashi en RCD. Continue reading

A View on Corruption and Gender in Lubumbashi

This week, Kiely Barnard-Webster follows up her post about gender and corruption with insights from RCN J&D’s Longin and Patricia about the Lubumbashi context. Click here to read the post in French.

This week, RCN J&D – implementers for the Central Africa Accountable Service Delivery Initiative (CAASDI) – spoke with me about the Are Women Less Corrupt? blog post. Together, the team of two, Longin (Head of Office) and Patricia (Project Manager), possess a rich and deep understanding of the criminal justice sector – as a Burundian ex-judge and practicing lawyer in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) respectively. They are currently working with a network of anti-corruption actors in Lubumbashi, DRC. Continue reading

Leverage Point

Identifying Leverage Points in Systemic Analysis and Planning for Anti-corruption Action

– Last week CDA Executive Director Peter Woodrow shared a systemic analysis of corruption in the criminal justice system in Lubumbashi. Today, Peter describes the process of working with local partners to develop the analysis. Responding to Peter’s introduction of key concepts in systems thinking and program design, the local stakeholders developed a common understanding of corruption and then identified possible points of intervention for change. In laying out possible initiatives, the group was able to balance priorities for change against what was most feasible for the context. –  Continue reading

A Systemic Analysis of Corruption in the Criminal Justice System in Lubumbashi, DRC

– part of our series on corruption in fragile states –

CDA has been working with local stakeholders and partners to develop a thorough understanding about how corruption works in the criminal justice system in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). After completing a broad national level analysis, the project has focused on Katanga Province in southeastern DRC. The main approach has been to support the establishment of a local network of people, including judges/magistrates, lawyers and others dedicated to promoting change in the system of corruption in the criminal justice sector. Click here to see the theory of change for the project. Continue reading

Network Lines

What Makes Corruption Complex? 

-the third in our corruption, criminal justice and legitimacy mini-series, and part of the series on corruption in fragile states

Simple and complex contexts are fundamentally different, as was described in last week’s post. The “complexity” or “simplicity” of the situation one is trying to address will affect what kinds of strategies and programs will be effective in promoting change. Yet when a situation is understood—and analyzed—as a simple problem, the risk of adapting a “simple” strategy that cannot address the dynamics of a complex problem is high.

This, we argue, is a challenge in many of today’s anti-corruption strategies being implemented by the international community.  Complex systems share certain characteristics that resonate clearly with the reality of corrupt contexts, particularly in fragile contexts: Continue reading

Who has a seat at the World Humanitarian Summit?

Sharing the Voices from CDA’s Humanitarian Effectiveness Project

With zero days, hours, and minutes left until the launch of the World Humanitarian Summit (WHS) in Istanbul, many in the sector anxiously await to see if the conversations will really cull commitments that can redirect a languorous humanitarian system. Public departures from these critical conversations by sector leaders, such as Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), have left the community to ruminate about the achievability Continue reading