Category Archives: Anti-Corruption

What anti-corruption practitioners should read about social norms

The literature on social norms and corruption needs to improve, and definitions need to be clarified, to enable practitioners to integrate the literature into programming. Cheyanne Scharbatke-Church and Russell Hathaway go into the details, and share resources sent in response to their previous blog on social norms and corruption. Including examples of programming with social norms. Continue reading

What We Learned About Blogging in a Year

If you are looking for an alternative way to share your program findings, definitely consider blogging. Within a year we succeeded in fostering a space for conversation between actors working in the field of anti-corruption in fragile states. On this anniversary, we want to share the key lessons we learned about blogging on corruption, and make the case for you to become involved.

As Mark Pyman argued last week, the anti-corruption sector can use more platforms like these, which try to break out of the methodological box, share program findings as they arise, and create a stage for voices from the full spectrum of stakeholders – including policy-makers, donors, and practitioners. We hope you find these six lessons about blogging inspirational! Continue reading

A helpful response to unhelpful research; and a call for ideas

– In January, Mark Pyman wrote a blog on this site on the unhelpful nature of anti-corruption research. Now Mark shares the key points from the many thoughtful and thought provoking responses it elicited. Inspired by the responses, he suggests what could be done to accelerate the usefulness of anti-corruption research, and ends with a call for ideas. – Continue reading

The case for systems in corruption analysis

– In this blog post we share a new video we created to reach those who are too busy to question the effectiveness of their current approaches, too invested in conventional methodology, or work in organizations that resist new ideas or – to be fair – reject our premise. Is the video clear and compelling? Could you imagine using it? With who and for what? – Continue reading

Approaching corruption through the lens of masculinities

– Héctor Portillo and Sebastián Molanon propose three ways in which the expectations, pressures, and privileges of “being a man” may shed light on male attitudes towards corruption. –

Although corruption is not by any means our field of study, we both grew up in countries where corruption is normalized to the point where not engaging in it is not only considered rare but naïve. Coincidentally, both of our countries of origin, Mexico and Colombia, also have a deeply embedded culture of sexism and machismo. Our personal experiences with sexism, masculinities, and corruption motivated us to explore how the expectations, pressures, and privileges of “being a man” can encourage or deter an individual’s engagement in corruption.

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Are social norms an important missing link in anti-corruption programming?

– In this post Cheyanne Scharbatke-Church and Russell Hathaway begin their deep dive into the world of social norms and its potential applicability to anti-corruption programming. They invite you to help further develop this line of inquiry. –

The Corruption, Justice and Legitimacy (CJL) program is developing a process to generate more effective anti-corruption programming through the creation of a systems-based analytic process.  Through our work to date, CJL has come to believe that social norms are a critical omission in the vast majority of corruption analysis in fragile states.  Critical, we argue, because social norms help explain how seemingly negative behaviors, such as corruption, are sustained over time.   This gap in understanding the context undermines the effectiveness of much anti-corruption programming.

Our question is: Can experience in social norm change on other issues – such as preventing addictions, diminishing campus binge drinking or stopping littering – inform theories of change within anti-corruption programming?

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