Category Archives: Anti-Corruption

Using the participatory monitoring approach, Most Significant Change, for an anti-corruption program

In this post, Sandra Sjögren and Cheyanne Scharbatke-Church discuss why they chose to use the Most Significant Change approach in monitoring an anti-corruption program in the DRC, the monitoring process, and in what ways it did (or did not) fit their needs. Amongst other things, their experience showcases some of the advantages and drawbacks of participatory monitoring.

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How might gender roles affect whether you engage, or hold back from, corruption?

In this post Kiely Barnard-Webster explains two key takeaways for practitioners from our recent field visit to the DRC: (1) If an anti-corruption program threatens a gender group’s privileged status, this must be taken into account in the program design or it will undermine effectiveness. (2) If anti-corruption strategies don’t account for the different ways in which gender groups engage in corruption these strategies may not work. Continue reading

Thematic Easy Access List of Corruption in Fragile States Series Posts

Is corruption a relevant framework for understanding the financial journey of refugees? What about social norms? And why is asking for the right framework a relevant question? Those are only a few of the many topics we’ve engaged in the nearly 40 blog posts we hosted so far about corruption in fragile states — today we take a bird’s-eye view of the ground we covered. Continue reading

How Corruption Impedes Reconstruction in Iraq after ISIS

In this post Matthew Schweitzer shares from his recent trip into eastern Mosul’s liberated territories. While he was there to assess relations between civil society organizations and security actors, he encountered many Moslawis who did not trust national politicians to manage long-term reconstruction. He talks in this post about the culture of corruption and patronage among politicians as one of the most significant obstacles to future stability in the their region, and about a path away from corruption.

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Recognizing the Potential “Destructive” Power of Social Norms

In this post Cheyanne and Russell share an early finding from their research into social norms in anti-corruption programming. Evidence shows that efforts to combat a harmful practice by depicting it as widespread or frequent can backfire by unintentionally increasing the practice. This bodes ill for well-intentioned programming like “I Paid a Bribe” sites that depict corruption as widespread, or for efforts to have the issue raised more in the press.

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